The status of the enemy – “Balthasar de Ayala,” Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy (Springer 2016)

David Lloyd Dusenbury, “Balthasar de Ayala”, Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy, ed. Marco Sgarbi (Springer 2016). [In press.] Several excerpts from the author’s typescript are copied below: Balthasar de Ayala, shortly before his death Biography Balthasar de Ayala was born in 1548 in Antwerp. His mother, Agnès de Renialme, belonged to the Hispano-Flemish nobility. His father,… Continue reading The status of the enemy – “Balthasar de Ayala,” Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy (Springer 2016)

Who judges whom? – “The Judgment of Pontius Pilate” (JLR 2017)

In Pilate and Jesus, Giorgio Agamben argues that Pontius Pilate never formally condemned Jesus of Nazareth. “The traditional interpretation of Jesus’ trial … must be revised,” he urges, because “there has not been any judgment in a technical sense.” On Agamben’s telling, Pilate’s non-judgment is the original truth of Jesus’ death which has been covered… Continue reading Who judges whom? – “The Judgment of Pontius Pilate” (JLR 2017)

“A philosophy of merciless war” – Carl Schmitt on hostis and inimicus (Ratio Juris 2015)

A critical and philological analysis of hostis and inimicus - 'public enemy' and 'private enemy' - in Carl Schmitt's Weimar-period essay, The Concept of the Political: David Lloyd Dusenbury, “Carl Schmitt on Hostis and Inimicus: A Veneer for Bloody-Mindedness,” Ratio Juris. An International Journal of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law 28.3 (2015), 431–440. An excerpt from the… Continue reading “A philosophy of merciless war” – Carl Schmitt on hostis and inimicus (Ratio Juris 2015)