Platonic Legislations (2017) in the Journal of Hellenic Studies

V. Bradley Lewis reviews my book Platonic Legislations: An Essay on Legal Critique in Ancient Greece (2017) in The Journal of Hellenic Studies (2019). He begins: "[Dusenbury's] argument can be briefly stated: law is a central object of Plato’s philosophical interest, so much so that he not only studies legislation, but engages in it, and this more than once (hence 'legislations'). But… Continue reading Platonic Legislations (2017) in the Journal of Hellenic Studies

“Data! Data! Data!” in Turkish

I am delighted that my TLS essay on Sherlock Holmes & the rise of AI has been done into Turkish at Düşünbil Portal. Read “Data! Data! Data!” here. It begins: "Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’nin danışman dedektif Sherlock Holmes’ü okuyucuyla ilk kez buluşturduğu kitabı Kızıl Dosya’nın ilk sahnelerinde tekinsiz bir şeyler var. Yer, geç Viktorya dönemi Londra’sı. Conan Doyle: '…İmparatorluğun… Continue reading “Data! Data! Data!” in Turkish

David Mirhady on Platonic Legislations (2017)

David Mirhady reviews my book Platonic Legislations (2017) in Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought (2019). Mirhady begins: "This short book turns to the writings of Plato to meditate on issues of legal change (‘the flux of law’) in the post-Soviet era. It does not assume previous knowledge of Plato’s thought. It may then be best… Continue reading David Mirhady on Platonic Legislations (2017)

Ancient cosmopolitanism Oxford

I will give a lecture on Nemesius of Emesa and late-antique cosmopolitanism at the XVIII. Oxford Patristics -- and I should mention that I am most grateful to the Association Internationale d’Études Patristiques for a designated grant. The conference will be held on 19-24 August 2019, hosted by the University of Oxford. Mandorla Mappa Mundi (Bodleian… Continue reading Ancient cosmopolitanism Oxford

“Unfortunate Galilean” in the TLS

I have an essay in this week's TLS on the Passion poems of George & Zbigniew Herbert. "In 1984, the Manhattan Review published a translation of Zbigniew Herbert’s poem, 'In the Margin of a Trial'. The trial in question was Jesus’s, and what Herbert sketched in its margin was a muted condemnation of the late-Soviet machinery of justice.… Continue reading “Unfortunate Galilean” in the TLS

Jesus – Epictetus

Epictetus, Discourses I 28.19: "Seek and you will find" (zetei kai heuresis).   Jesus, Luke 11.9: "Seek and you will find" (zeteite kai heuresete).   Note - as Thorsteinsson does not - that Jesus died roughly thirty years before Epictetus was born: R. M. Thorsteinsson, Jesus as Philosopher (Oxford, 2018), 159.

“The World City” – a forthcoming article on Nemesius of Emesa

Stoic philosophers in antiquity held that ‘the world … is like a city and a polity’, and that the nature of humankind is like ‘a code of civil law’ (Cicero, De Finibus III 62–67). In his late-antique text, De Natura Hominis (ca. 390 A.D.), Nemesius of Emesa rejects a number of Stoic tenets. His world… Continue reading “The World City” – a forthcoming article on Nemesius of Emesa